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Ojai Valley LENS Neurofeedback 2018-06-30T20:03:27+00:00

Ventura Countys only
LENSware3™ Neurofeedback Provider

Ask about BodyLens™ for your aches, pains and recovery!

LENS Ventura County

What is LENS Neurofeedback?

Neuroscientists now recognize that our brains are capable of changing over time and that neural pathways do reorganize themselves in response to conditions outside the brain. This reorganization of our neural pathways might be the result of trauma, such as a traumatic brain injury, or due to anxiety and stress.

Like a computer hard drive, portions of the brain can become fragmented and disconnected. Functioning declines when the brain loses integration.

Low Energy Neurofeedback (LENS) technology recognizes brainwave patterns that are disrupted or maladapted and sends feedback that ‘nudges’ the brains neural pathways toward improved functioning, helping the brain reintegrate itself.

We use a system called LENS (Low energy Neurofeedback System)—a technology that interrupts problematic neural patterns and causes a shift toward more productive and efficient brain function.

What if you could improve your daily life functioning, from working memory to long-term memory, reading ability, problem solving, clarity of mind and the capacity for insight? What if you could enjoy relief from anxiety, depression, problems sleeping, and cravings?

Once you’ve completed the questionnaire, please contact us to set up an appointment.

Start your CNS Questionnaire here!

LENS Neurofeedback helps a helicopter crash survivor recovery from PTSD: a short documentary

This true story is an inspiring look into the recovery of professional snowboarder, Don Schwartz as he 

fights through the physical and mental scars that are a result of a horrific helicopter crash 

that took the lives of three of his friends and left him burning alive.

Client Testimonials

We are fully dedicated to our clients, here’s what they have been saying

When I awoke from the my brain needs rest nap. I felt alive more a part of my own life verses the I’m watching my life like a movie. Really pretty amazing that this came about because it has been a very short time and number of sessions
D
“On the 1st night after my first session, I slept better than I had in years.”
ML
“For the past eight years I’d wake up with a migraine. That’s how my days began. After the second session, I woke up with the usual migraine, and then suddenly it burst! Just like that, it was gone.”
T
I havent slept well since I had chemo, after some LENS sessions I’m now sleeping better than ever before
PM
My son was getting Doesn’t Stay on Task notes daily. After only 6 sessions, he now brings home his paper saying Stays on Task, and his grades are improving. He’s more outspoken now, but in a good way.
JP
There has been a bit of the return of enthusiasm …..which I lacked the last few years is VERY nice….I feel like I’m “here” present in my own life to a greater extent. WOW
D
Just to check in, all is well, music again sounds amazing, feel incredibly focused and positive and have very heightened senses, like very heightened!
L
Anxiety

Anxiety

“LENS is exceptionally effective at reducing anxiety. Ninety percent of clients begin to experience improvement in the first or second session. LENS Neurofeedback also improves resilience, the ability to handle stress, and helps create a sense of calm in difficult situations”. —D. Dubin, MD

ADD / ADHD Brain

ADD / ADHD

“Developed by Dr. Len Ochs, in 1992, LENS Neurofeedback has had extraordinary results using weak electromagnetic fields to stimulate brain-wave activity and restore brain flexibility. A controlled study of 100 subjects with different diagnoses — ADHD, traumatic brain injury, bipolar disorder — showed that 90 percent of them did better after LENS.” —ADDitude Magazine

Addiction panel

Addiction

“LENS Neurofeedback is so effective at reducing relapse rate because so many people suffering from substance abuse are also struggling with depression, anxiety, insomnia, and trauma. Because neurofeedback can be so effective at treating these, it is much easier to remain abstinent. Neurofeedback is also extremely helpful withdrawing from antidepressants, sleeping pills, benzodiazepines and other medications.” —D. Dubin, MD

Autism

Autism / Aspergers

“A 2006 study using neurofeedback showed a 40 percent reduction in autistic symptoms, enhancement of function between the brain and behavior, and reduction of hyper connectivity….”   —Science Daily

Children and Teens: No more Band-Aids or blaming parents
“Instead of teaching parents coping strategies and behavioral “containment” techniques, therapists can now directly address dysfunctions in your child’s brain. LENS neurofeedback resets the brain for optimal functioning, without drugs, effort, or belief by the child.” —Grant Rudolph, MFT

TBI

Concussions / TBI

“Many people who have lost their clear thinking, memory, motivation, or sense of humor – people with migraines, irritability, ADD, sleep disorders, learning disabilities and many other symptoms, don’t realize their troubles began after a long-forgotten whiplash in a car accident, head blow in sports or work, a fall, stroke or coma.  And people who consider themselves normal are often surprised by how much LENS neurofeedback boosts them into peak performance ”—Grant Rudolph, MFT

Depression

Depression

“Neurofeedback treatments for depression (Baehr, Rosenfeld, & Baehr 1997, 2001; Hammond, 2000, 2004) appear very promising not only in bringing relief from depression, but in modifying the underlying biological predisposition for becoming depressed. Neurofeedback focuses on retraining the brain, for example, reversing the frontal brainwave asymmetry, with the goal of producing an enduring change that does not require people to remain on medication indefinitely.”

—D. Corydon Hammond, PhD

migraine headaches

Headaches / Migraines

“We have had lots of opportunities with incipient or even full-blown migraines [for Low Energy Neurofeedback].  The results can be dramatic: often the headache is aborted on the spot or its severity is greatly reduced.” —Steven Larsen, PhD

“With the decrease of physical pain, there is an improvement in energy because, as Len Ochs says, one recovers all the energy one previously spent defending against the pain.” —Steven Larsen, PhD

anger road rage

Explosive Anger

“We now know that certain compulsive behaviors, rituals and repetitive behaviors, tics, emotional outbursts, and even grand mal seizures, all have their basis in the neurology of the brain.  In the LENS we have found a valuable, often effective and drug-free approach to calming the nervous systems in its hurricane and tsunami moods… and ultimately helping it develop its own spontaneous ability to suppress seizures.” —Steven Larsen, PHD

PTSD

PTSD

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a significant problem in the US, especially with the returning of Veterans from the Afghan and Iraqi Wars.

LENS can dramatically and effectively decrease the anxiety associated PTSD, helping to improve sleep, and restore a sense of calm and inner peace.

“Staff Sgt. Roberts, however, doesn’t care how neurofeedback works — only that it does. Despite being told by doctors that he’d never be healthy enough to return to his former life as a police officer in Dallas, Roberts is back at work — and credits neurofeedback with the turnaround.” —The Daily

My body feels more relaxed. I feel mellow. It feels as though my entire body has undergone ‘spell-check.’   68-year-old female with PTSD

Wedding rings

Marriage & Couples Counseling

“Much of the work of couples counseling can now be accomplished more efficiently through passive LENS Neurofeedback… What if your partner COULD just stop being annoying?” —Grant Rudolph, MFT

performance

Peak Performance

“Perhaps the most noticeable thing is reduction of performance anxiety, and an ability to jump into things easily and see what is required. Routines and subroutines are acquired relatively easily, and I notice myself less and less stuck on self-criticism or negative witness of my own performance.” —Steven Larsen, PhD

 

Avada Admin

and finally…

LENS technology helps maintain healthy cognitive function, mental clarity, energy and moods, thus enhancing our life experiences and enjoyment as we age.

Meet the Neurofeedback Team

@ Alpha Neurofeedback a provider of LENS Neurofeedback

Dr. Edie Resto D.C.
Dr. Edie Resto D.C.Co-Founder
Dr. Edie is a holistic doctor and educator dedicated to forming healing partnerships with her patients. She is a graduate of the Institute of Psychostructural Balancing where she studied a variety of massage and body work. Dr. Edie is also a graduate of the Life Chiropractic College West and Bastyr University, which is the leading Naturopathic Medical School in the United States.

Dr. Edie integrates many different modalities for a powerful healing experience.

Kala Rexroad
Kala RexroadCo-Founder - Certified LENS Neurofeedback Clinician
Kala is the Tour de Force behind the LENS Neurofeedback sessions at Amara of Ojai, as well as wearing the IT technical hat for the Clinic, our Websites & Mobile APP. She immerses herself in research on the latest developments in the field and is in constant contact with teachers and instructors around the world who share their cases, experiences, and methods. Kala likes to explain LENS like this: “When the brain gets stuck in patterns that are detrimental, LENS technology nudges the brain back into more productive pathways. LENS essentially ‘reboots the brain’ much like you reboot your computer.
Judy Gabriel
Judy GabrielBodyLens Technician
We welcome Judy Gabriel to our Neurofeedback Team! Starting October 1, 2017!

Judy plays a few roles at Alpha Neurofeedback. You will see firsthand that she keeps us moving with her organizational skills. As one client said, “Judy is an immensely gifted intuitive. She worked with sensitivity, clarity and heart as she unveiled and addressed the balance and health issues in my body.” Restore the balance of frequencies and eliminate any illness blocking your health. She uses the perfect blend of intuition and technology.

Research papers on Neurofeedback

* Best when viewed on computer

Miller, J.A. (2013). Breaking the bars: Sustainable recovery vs. incarceration (unpublished paper).

Miller, J.A.(2013). Neurotherapy as an adjunct therapy for addiction solutions: Neurological recovery model (unpublished paper).

Miller, J.A. (2013). Neurotherapy for sustainable addiction recovery: An integrated model. Paper presented at the annual International Society of Neurofeedback and Research Conference, Dallas, TX.

Miller, J.A. (2014). Low energy neurofeedback: A primary key to prescription medication dependence recovery (unpublished paper).

Burkett, V. S., Cummins, J. M., Dickson, R. M., & Skolnick, M. (2005). An open clinical trial utilizing real-time EEG operant conditioning as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of crack cocaine dependence. Journal of Neurotherapy, 9(2), 27–48.

Callaway, T.G, Bodenhamer-Davis, E. (2008). Long-term follow-up of a clinical replication of the Peniston Protocol for chemical dependency. Journal of Neurotherapy, 12(4), 243–259.

deBeus, R. J. (2007). Quantitative electroencephalography-guided versus Scott/Peniston neurofeedback with substance abuse outpatients: A pilot study. Biofeedback, 35(4), 146–151.

Fahrion, S. L., Walters, E. D., Coyne, L., & Allen, T. (1992). Alterations in EEG amplitude, personality factors and brain electrical mapping after alpha theta brainwave training: A controlled case study of an alcoholic in recovery. Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, 16, 547–552.

Fahrion, S. L. (1995). Human potential and personal transformation. Subtle Energies, 6, 55–88.

Goldberg, R. J., et al. (1976). Alpha conditioning as an adjunct treatment for drug dependence: Part I. International Journal of Addiction, 11, 1085–1089.

Goldberg, R. J., et al. (1977). Alpha conditioning as an adjunct treatment for drug dependence: Part II. International Journal of Addiction, 12, 195–204.

Horrell, T., El-Baz, A., Baruth, J., Tasman, A., Sokhadze, G., Stewart, C., Sokhadze, E. (2010). Neurofeedback effects on evoked and induced EEG gamma band reactivity to drug-related cues in cocaine addiction. Journal of Neurotherapy, 14(3), 195–216.

Kelly, M. J. (1997). Native Americans, neurofeedback, and substance abuse theory: Three year outcome of alpha/theta neurofeedback training in the treatment of problem drinking among Dine= (Navajo) people. Journal of Neurotherapy, 2(3), 24–60.

Lamontague, Y., Hand, I., Annable, L., et al. (1975). Physiological and psychological effects of alpha and EMG feedback training with college drug users: A pilot study. Canadian Psychiatric Association Journal, 20, 337–349.

Passini, F., Watson, C. G., Dehnel, L., Herder, J., & Watkins, B. (1977). Alpha wave biofeedback training therapy in alcoholics. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 33(1), 292299.

Peniston, E. G., & Kulkosky, P. J. (1989). Alpha-theta brainwave training and beta-endorphin levels in alcoholics. Alcohol: Clinical & Experimental Research, 13(2), 271279.

Peniston, E. G., & Kulkosky, P. J. (1991). Alcoholic personality and alpha-theta brainwave training. Medical Psychotherapy, 2, 37–55.

Peniston, E. G., Marrinan, D. A., Deming, W. A., & Kulkosky, P. J. (1993). EEG alpha-theta brainwave synchronization in Vietnam theater veterans with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol abuse. Advances in Medical Psychotherapy, 6, 37–50.

Saxby, E., & Peniston, E. G. (1995). Alpha-theta brainwave neurofeedback training: An effective treatment for male and female alcoholics with depressive symptoms. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 51(5), 685–693.

Schneider, F., Elbert, T., Heimann, H., Welker, A., Stetter, F., Mattes, R., Birbaumer, N., & Mann, K. (1993). Self-regulation of slow cortical potentials in psychiatric patients: Alcohol dependency. Biofeedback & Self-Regulation, 18, 23–32.

Scott, W., & Kaiser, D. (1998). Augmenting chemical dependency treatment with neurofeedback training. Journal of Neurotherapy, 3(1), 66.

Scott, W. C., Kaiser, D., Othmer, S., Sideroff, S. I. (2005) Effects of an EEG Biofeedback Protocol on a Mixed Substance Abusing Population. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 31(3), 455-469

Sokhadze, E., Stewart, C., Hollifield, M., Tasman, A. (2008). Event-related potential study of executive dysfunctions in a speeded reaction task in cocaine addiction. Journal of Neurotherapy, 12(4), 185–204.

Sokhadze, E., Singh, S., Stewart, C., Hollifield, M., El-Baz, A., Tasman, A. (2008). Attentional bias to drug-and stress-related pictorial cues in cocaine addiction comorbid with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Journal of Neurotherapy, 12(4), 205–225.

Sokhadze, E. M., Cannon R. L., & Trudeau D. L. (2008) EEG biofeedback as a treatment for Substance Use Disorders: review, rating of efficacy, and recommendations for further research. Journal of Neurotherapy, 12(1), 5–43.

Sokhadze, T. M., Stewart, C. M., & Hollifield, M. (2007). Integrating cognitive neuroscience and cognitive behavioral treatment with neurofeedback therapy in drug addiction comorbid with posttraumatic stress disorder: A conceptual review. Journal of Neurotherapy, 11(2), 13–44.

Sokhadze, T. M., Cannon, R. L., & Trudeau, D. L. (2008). EEG biofeedback as a treatment for substance use disorders: Review, rating of efficacy, and recommendations for further research. Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback, 33(1), 1–28.

Trudeau, D. L. (2008) Brainwave biofeedback for addictive disorder. Journal of Neurotherapy, 12(4), 181–183.

Trudeau, D. L. (2005). Applicability of brain wave biofeedback to substance use disorder in adolescents. Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 14(1), 125136.

Trudeau, D. L. (2000). The treatment of addictive disorders by brain wave biofeedback: A review and suggestions for future research. Clinical Electroencephalography, 31(1), 1322.

Watson, C. G., Herder, J., & Passini, F. T. (1978). Alpha biofeedback therapy in alcoholics: An 18-month follow-up. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 34(3), 765–769.

Larsen, S. (2012). The neurofeedback solution: How to treat autism, ADHD, anxiety, brain injury, stroke, PTSD and more. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press.

Alhambra, M. A., Fowler, T. P., & Alhambra, A. A. (1995). EEG biofeedback: A new treatment option for ADD/ADHD. Journal of Neurotherapy, 1(2), 39–43.

Arns, M. (2012). EEG-based personalized medicine in ADHD: Individual alpha peak frequency as an endophenotype associated with nonresponse. Journal of Neurotherapy.

Arns, M, de Ridder, S, Strehl, U, Breteler, M, & Coenen, A. (2009). Efficacy of neurofeedback treatment in ADHD: The effects on inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity: A meta-analysis. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 40(3) 180–189.

Barabasz, A., & Barabasz, M. (1996). Neurotherapy and alert hypnosis in the treatment of attention deficit disorder. Chapter in S. J. Lynn, I. Kirsch, & J. W. Rhue (Eds.), Casebook of Clinical Hypnosis. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association Press, 271–292.

Barabasz, A., & Barabasz, M. (2000). Treating AD/HD with hypnosis and neurotherapy. Child Study Journal, 30(1), 25–42.

Beauregard, M., & Levesque, J. (2006). Functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the effects of neurofeedback training on the neural bases of selective attention and response inhibition in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback, 31(1), 3–20.

Becerra J, Fernndez T, Harmony T, Caballero MI, Garcia F, Fernandez-Bouzas A, Santiago-Rodriguez E, Prado-Alcalá RA. (2006) “Follow-up study of Learning Disabled children treated with Neurofeedback or placebo.” Clinical EEG & Neuroscience, 37 (3), 198–203.

Boyd, W. D., & Campbell, S. E. (1998). EEG biofeedback in the schools: The use of EEG biofeedback to treat ADHD in a school setting. Journal of Neurotherapy, 2(4), 65–71.

Breteler, M. H. M., Arns, M., Peters, S., Giepmans, I., & Verhoeven, L. (2010). Improvements in spelling after QEEG-based neurofeedback in dyslexia: A randomized controlled treatment study. Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback, 35(1), 5–11.

Breteler, R., Pesch, W., Nadorp, M. (2012) Neurofeedback in residential children and adolescents with mild mental retardation and ADHD behavior. Journal of Neurotherapy.
Carmody, D. P., Radvanski, D. C., Wadhwani, S., Sabo, J. J., & Vergara, L. (2001). EEG biofeedback training and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in an elementary school setting. Journal of Neurotherapy, 4(3), 5–27.

Carter, J. L., & Russell, H. L. (1991). Changes in verbal performance IQ discrepancy scores after left hemisphere frequency control training: A pilot report. American Journal of Clinical Biofeedback, 4(1), 66–67

Cunningham, M., & Murphy, P. (1981). The effects of bilateral EEG biofeedback on verbal, visuospatial and creative skills in LD male adolescents. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 14(4), 204–208.

Drechsler R, Straub M, Doehnert M, Heinrich H, Steinhausen H, Brandeis D. (2007). Controlled evaluation of a neurofeedback training of slow cortical potentials in children with ADHD. Behavioral & Brain Functions, 3, 35.

Dupuy, E. F., & Clarke, A.(2012). EEG activity in females with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder.

Egner, T., & Gruzelier, J. H. (2001). Learned self-regulation of EEG frequency Components affects attention and event-related brain potentials in humans. NeuroReport, 12, 4155–4159.

Egner, T., & Gruzelier, J. H. (2004). EEG biofeedback of low beta band components: Frequency-specific effects on variables of attention and event-related brain potentials. Clinical Neurophysiology, 115, 131–139.

Fehmi, L. G. (2007). Multichannel EEG phase synchrony training and verbally guided attention training for disorders of attention. Chapter in J. R. Evans (Ed.), Handbook of Neurofeedback. Binghampton, NY: Haworth Medical Press, 301–319.

Fehmi, L. G. (1978). EEG biofeedback, multichannel synchrony training, and attention. Chapter in A. A. Sugarman & R. E. Tarter (Eds.), Expanding Dimensions of Consciousness. New York: Springer.

Fehmi, L. G., & Selzer, F. A. (1980). Biofeedback and attention training. Chapter in S. Boorstein (Ed.), Transpersonal Psychotherapy. Palo Alto: Science and Behavior Books

Fernandez, T., Herrera, W., Harmony, T., Diaz-Comas, L., Santiago, E., Sanchez, L., Bosch, J., Fernandez-Bouzas, A., Otero, G., Ricardo-Garcell, J., Barraza, C., Aubert, E., Galan, L., & Valdes, P. (2003). EEG and behavioral changes following neurofeedback treatment in learning disabled children. Clinical Electroencephalography, 34(3), 145–150.

Fleischman, M. J., & Othmer, S. (2005). Case study: Improvements in IQ score and maintenance of gains following EEG biofeedback with mildly developmentally delayed twins. Journal of Neurotherapy, 9(4), 35–46.

Foks, M. (2005). Neurofeedback training as an educational intervention in a school setting: How the regulation of arousal states can lead to improved attention and behaviour in children with special needs. Educational & Child Psychology, 22(3), 6777.

Fox, D. J., Tharp, D. F., & Fox, L. C. (2005). Neurofeedback: An alternative and efficacious treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback, 30(4), 365–274.

Fritson, K. K., Wadkins, T. A., Gerdes, P., & Hof, D. (2007). The impact of neurotherapy on college students’ cognitive abilities and emotions. Journal of Neurotherapy, 11(4), 1–9.

Fuchs, T., Birbaumer, N., Lutzenberger, W., Gruzelier, J. H., & Kaiser, J. (2003). Neurofeedback treatment for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children: A comparison with methylphenidate. Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 28, 112.

Gani C., Birbaumer N. & Strehl U.(2008). Long term effects after feedback of slow cortical potentials and of theta-beta amplitudes in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD). International Journal of Bioelectromagnetism, 10(4), 209–232.

Gross, E., El-Baz-Ayman A, S., Sokhadze, G, E. (2012). Induced EEG gamma oscillation alignment improves differentiation between autism and ADHD group responses in a facial categorization task. Journal of Neurotherapy.

Hansen, L. M., Trudeau, D., & Grace, L. (1996). Neurotherapy and drug therapy in combination for adult ADHD, personality disorder, and seizure. Journal of Neurotherapy, 2(1), 6–14.

Hirshberg, L. M. (2007). Place of electroencephalographic biofeedback for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 7(4), 315–319.

Hallowell, E.M., & Jensen, P.S. (2010). Superparenting for ADD. New York, NY: Ballentine Books. 162-164.

Hong, C., Lee, I. (2012). Effects of neurofeedback training on attention in children with intellectual disability. Journal of Neurotherapy

Jackson, G. M., & Eberly, D. A. (1982). Facilitation of performance on an arithmetic task as a result of the application of a biofeedback procedure to suppress alpha wave activity. Biofeedback & Self-Regulation, 7(2), 211–221.

Jacobs, E. H. (2005). Neurofeedback treatment of two children with learning, attention, mood, social, and developmental deficits. Journal of Neurotherapy, 9(4), 55–70.

Kaiser, D. A., & Othmer, S. (2000). Effect of Neurofeedback on variables of attention in a large multi-center trial. Journal of Neurotherapy, 4(1), 5–15.

Kirk, L. (2007). Neurofeedback protocols for subtypes of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Chapter in J. R. Evans (Ed.), Handbook of Neurofeedback. Binghampton, NY: Haworth Medical Press, 267–299.

Kotwal, D. B., Burns, W. J., & Montgomery, D. D. (1996). Computer-assisted cognitive training for ADHD: A case study. Behavior Modification, 20(1), 85–96.

Kropotov, J. D., Grin-Yatsenko, V. A., Ponomarev, V. A., Chutko, L. S., Yakovenko, E. A., & Nikishena, I. S. (2007). Changes in EEG spectograms, event-related potentials and event-related desynchronization induced by relative beta training in ADHD children. Journal of Neurotherapy, 11(2), 3–11.

Kropotov, J. D., Grin-Yatsenko, V. A., Ponomarev, V. A., Chutko, L. S., Yakovenko, E. A., Nildshena, I. S. (2005). ERPs correlates of EEG relative beta training in ADHD children. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 55(1), 23–34.

Kwon, H., Cho, J., Lee, E. (2009). EEG asymmetry analysis of the left and right brain activities during simple versus complex arithmetic learning. Journal of Neurotherapy, 13(2), 109–116.

Leins, U., Goth, G., Hinterberger, T., Klinger, C., Rumpf, N., & Strehl, U. (2007). Neurofeedback for children with ADHD: A comparison of SCP and theta/beta protocols. Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback, 32(2), 73–88.

Levesque, J., Beauregard, M., & Mensour, B. (2006). Effect of neurofeedback training on the neural substrates of selective attention in children with attention–deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Neuroscience Letters, 394(3), 216–221.

Linden, M., Habib, T., & Radojevic, V. (1996). A controlled study of the effects of EEG biofeedback on cognition and behavior of children with attention deficit disorder and learning disabilities. Biofeedback & Self-Regulation, 21(1), 35–49.

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Perreau-Linck, E., Lessard, N., Lévesque, J., Beauregard, M. (2010). Effects of neurofeedback training on inhibitory capacities in ADHD children: A single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Journal of Neurotherapy, 14(3), 229–242.

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